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Mon
14
Mar '11

Yukon Gold Drunken Chicken & Biscuit Pot Pie Recipe

Yukon Gold Drunken Chicken Biscuit Pot Pie Recipe by Doug DuCap

Doug DuCap's Original Recipes

Now tell me, kids, who doesn’t love pot pie?

(You there! Yes, you in the back with your hand raised — you don’t love pot pie? Get out of my classroom!)

We all love chicken pot pie, right? Good! Well, this one is extra specially delicious. Why? Because it’s got tasty chicken and veggies in a golden, pillowy biscuit crust, plus it’s got the added bonus of everyone’s favorite sauce. Now tell me, class, who doesn’t love beer? Yep, that’s what I thought!

Black & Tan beer is a very fetching combination of porter and lager. In fact, I find myself fetching it from the refrigerator over and over until it’s gone.

My brand of choice is Yuengling (pronounced ‘ying-ling’), which may sound like a Chinese beer, but it’s actually made in Pennsylvania at America’s oldest brewery (yeah, I read beer labels.) Their slogan is “Yuengling — The Beer That Made Pottsville Famous.” (Alright, it isn’t but it certainly should be; Pottsville, PA deserves to be famous!)

***

Free Bonus Joke: Why did Alice B. Toklas invent Hash Brownies?
Because someone had already done Pot Pies!

(BTW, does eating food that contains munchie-inducing ingredients generate Perpetual Motion? Just asking.)

Here’s how to make the Yukon Gold Drunken Chicken & Biscuit Pot Pie Recipe:

Ingredients:

2 1/2 cups chicken stock or broth
2 lbs boneless, skinless, chicken breast
1 1/2 cup chopped onions
1 1/2 cup sliced carrots (1/4 inch slices)
1/2 tsp black pepper
2 1/2 cups diced Yukon Gold potatoes
1 roll refrigerated ‘Grands’-type biscuits (’Flaky Layer’ style)
12 oz ‘Black & Tan’ beer (I use Yuengling)
2 tsp dried tarragon
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp ground allspice (or nutmeg)
2 Tbsp corn starch (mixed with 2 Tbsp cold water)
1/2 cup chopped roasted red peppers
1 1/2 cups grated sharp Cheddar cheese

PREPARATION:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a stockpot or large saucepan, bring the stock, chicken, onion, carrots, and black pepper to a simmer; cover and cook 5 min.

Add the potatoes, return to a simmer, and cook 6-7 minutes until the potatoes are just tender. Remove the chicken and vegetables from the stock and set aside. Reserve the stock.

Remove and separate the biscuits. Take a biscuit, find a spot between the layers about halfway down, and carefully separate it into two approximately equal halves (in other words, two round, half-height biscuits.) Repeat with the rest of the biscuits.

Generously coat the inside of a large casserole dish with cooking spray. Take eight of the ‘half-biscuits’ and line the bottom of the casserole, stretching and overlapping where necessary. Bake at 350 degrees for 10-12 minutes until lightly browned.

While the biscuits are baking, add the beer, tarragon, cayenne, and allspice to the stock. Bring to a low boil and cook 5 minutes.

Stir in the corn starch and continue stirring until thickened (about 1 minute.) Remove from the heat and stir in the chicken / veg mixture and the red peppers. Adjust salt and pepper to taste.

Ladle the filling into the casserole, sprinkle on the cheese, and top with the remaining biscuits, stretching and overlapping where necessary (rustic-looking is good!)

Bake 12-15 minutes or until biscuits are golden.

NOTE: To prevent the underside of the bottom layer of biscuits from becoming too dark, place the casserole in a heavy baking pan or cookie sheet to diffuse the heat.

Enjoy!

You Can Read More of Doug’s Recipe Corner Here.

Hugging the Coast Blog Fast ForwardPlease join us soon to see our latest food and cooking article: New Fish and Seafood Recipe Ideas and Tips on About.Com: March 8th to March 15th 2011.

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(Photo Credit: Yukon Gold Drunken Chicken Biscuit Pot Pie from Doug DuCap Food and Travel on Flickr.


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Mon
7
Mar '11

Peppery Cheddar Cheese Medallions Appetizer Recipe

Peppery Cheddar Cheese Medallions Baked Appetizer Side Dish Recipe by Doug DuCap

Doug DuCap's Original Recipes

Be careful when you take these out of the oven. They’re going to smell so incredibly wonderful that you might be tempted to start stuffing them into your mouth immediately.

But don’t give in, otherwise, two things will happen in short order: one, you will burn your mouth, because these biscuits are intensely cheesey (and cheese stays hot); and two, you’re probably going to push through the pain and eat them anyway. And if you aren’t careful, they’ll all be gone before you have a chance to serve them.

How good are they? Let’s put it this way, the above caveat is the result of hard-won experience.

Incidentally, I was going to call these Wisconsin State Legislature Gridlock Biscuits, but that title seemed a little unwieldy. Still, it certainly would be a great way for lawmakers to open a dialogue — by reaching across the aisle and offering a plate of these peppery, golden, cheese-laden nuggets. After a few bites, lawmakers will set aside their differences and come together in a spirit of friendship, shared purpose, and love of cheese.

Well, it would be nice if it turned out that way, wouldn’t it?

Here’s how to make the Peppery Cheddar Cheese Medallions:

Ingredients:

1 lb shredded mild cheddar cheese
1 cup all purpose flour
1 1/2 Tbsp baking powder
1 Tbsp black pepper (yes, a whole tablespoon)
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper (optional)
1 cup half & half (or whole milk)

PREPARATION:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Combine the cheese and the dry ingredients. Add the milk and mix thoroughly.

Form dough into balls about the size of a large walnut and place on a non-stick cookie sheet, leaving plenty of space between (these spread out quite a bit.)

Bake at 350 degrees on the center rack of the oven for 25-30 minutes until a rich golden brown. Serve warm or at room temperature. Store any extras in the refrigerator.

Enjoy!

You Can Read More of Doug’s Recipe Corner Here.

Hugging the Coast Blog Fast ForwardPlease join us soon to see our latest food and cooking article: Save Money When You Make Shrimp: A Quick Shrimp Stock Recipe.

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If you liked this article on HuggingtheCoast.Com, you might also enjoy:

(Photo Credit: Peppery Cheddar Cheese Medallions Recipe from Doug DuCap Food and Travel on Flickr.


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Wed
9
Feb '11

Food Humor: The Hidden Dangers of Food Writing

Book Excerpts and Food Articles by Doug DuCap

The hardest part of writing about food is that it always, without fail, makes me hungry.

For instance, I’m sitting here at my desk this morning, going through a folder of some of my ‘recipes’ from way back in the days before I got serious about proper recipe development. This folder, which I tend to avoid out of embarrassment more than laziness, contains lots and lots of good ideas.

Unfortunately, those good ideas are housed in the olive oil-and masala-stained scraps of brown paper bags, calendar pages, paper towels, etc on which I scribbled notes listing fourteen ingredients (but no quantities), with instructions like ‘Cook til done’ (with no temperature or times).

Apparently, at the time of writing I believed that since the dish was good enough to write down, then the meaning contained in those vague scribbles would all be very obvious when I read them again in five years.

Yeah, right. For all their memory-jogging power, some of these recipes might as well be pages from The Voynich Manuscript Cookbook.

Food Writing Dangers: Humor

But as I said, there are some real gems in the rockpile, and as I’m sitting here sifting through them, I suddenly I realize that I’m absolutely ravenous. Mind you, I just finished breakfast about 20 minutes ago (a handsome blue cheese omelet with buttered, toasted French Country bread and this great, locally-made parsley & shallot sausage that…hey, you know what? I think there was one piece of that sausage left…)

Um, excuse me a moment. I’ll be back in two tics…

…Okay, I’m back. Sorry about the delay; I had to make myself another piece of toast, too.

As I was saying, it really is much harder than you might imagine to actually get any food writing done. To give you some idea, here’s an analogy: Imagine that you’re a travel writer in a closed, windowless office in front of a computer, writing about a beautiful white sand beach over which temperate tropical breezes gently waft while tanned, barely dressed (insert gender of your choice) natives cavort in the surf.

Now, imagine that the beach is right outside; all you’d have to do is leave your office, go down the hall and out the front door and there you are, on the beach. How hard would it be for you to sit in your closed room and write?

Well, that’s how I feel about my kitchen at times like this.

All those mysterious ‘recipes’ have made me want to start on what my wife wryly refers to as ‘a three-state cooking spree’, after which she replaces the food magazines on the coffee table with catalogs for institutional dishwashers and commercial double sinks with overhead sprayers.

(Note to young couples: drollery is an incurable addiction. If you’re not droll now, don’t start).

One of the recipes I came across (that I can actually decode) was for a cilantro-stuffed roast boneless leg of lamb with a garlic and chipotle rub. I almost went cross-eyed with the memory of how that smelled when it came out of the oven. Another was for a five-layer polenta ‘cake’ with a buttery Chianti sauce.

The paper bag it was written on was a bit smudgy, but I could still read the ingredients and get the gist of it: a concerto of mushrooms, zucchini, celery, carrots and onions sauteed in garlic and fresh basil, alternating with mozzarella and wilted greens in a spring-form pan between layers of Parmesan-flavored polenta, topped with slices of plum tomatoes and basil leaves. The presentation was magnificent, and it left a table of surprise dinner guests immensely satisfied, lingering to pursue the last fragrant traces of its rich, dark sauce with bits of crusty bread.

As I recall, it was an impromptu creation, since I had the basic ingredients on hand and…in fact, I probably do now. You know what? Let me just go check…and maybe put the water on to boil. This will only take a minute.

I’ll be right back…

Hugging the Coast Blog Fast ForwardPlease join us soon to read our newest food and cooking article on HuggingtheCoast.Com: New Fish and Seafood Recipe Ideas and Tips on About.Com: February 4th to February 10th 2011.

Hugging the Coast Blog Fast Forward

If you liked this article on HuggingtheCoast.Com, you might also enjoy:

(Photo Credit: Mal de Gorge byToNToN CoPT on Flickr and Danger 415 Volts by Patrick H. Lauke on Flickr.)


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Find Out More About the Knack Fish & Seafood Cookbook by Doug DuCap and Linda Beaulieu Enjoy Doug's Original Seafood Recipes on About.Com Fish and Seafood Cooking

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Find Out More About the Knack Fish & Seafood Cookbook by Doug DuCap and Linda Beaulieu




Find Free Original RecipesRead Previous Posts Knack Fish and Seafood Cookbook

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