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Mon
14
Mar '11

Yukon Gold Drunken Chicken & Biscuit Pot Pie Recipe

Yukon Gold Drunken Chicken Biscuit Pot Pie Recipe by Doug DuCap

Doug DuCap's Original Recipes

Now tell me, kids, who doesn’t love pot pie?

(You there! Yes, you in the back with your hand raised — you don’t love pot pie? Get out of my classroom!)

We all love chicken pot pie, right? Good! Well, this one is extra specially delicious. Why? Because it’s got tasty chicken and veggies in a golden, pillowy biscuit crust, plus it’s got the added bonus of everyone’s favorite sauce. Now tell me, class, who doesn’t love beer? Yep, that’s what I thought!

Black & Tan beer is a very fetching combination of porter and lager. In fact, I find myself fetching it from the refrigerator over and over until it’s gone.

My brand of choice is Yuengling (pronounced ‘ying-ling’), which may sound like a Chinese beer, but it’s actually made in Pennsylvania at America’s oldest brewery (yeah, I read beer labels.) Their slogan is “Yuengling — The Beer That Made Pottsville Famous.” (Alright, it isn’t but it certainly should be; Pottsville, PA deserves to be famous!)

***

Free Bonus Joke: Why did Alice B. Toklas invent Hash Brownies?
Because someone had already done Pot Pies!

(BTW, does eating food that contains munchie-inducing ingredients generate Perpetual Motion? Just asking.)

Here’s how to make the Yukon Gold Drunken Chicken & Biscuit Pot Pie Recipe:

Ingredients:

2 1/2 cups chicken stock or broth
2 lbs boneless, skinless, chicken breast
1 1/2 cup chopped onions
1 1/2 cup sliced carrots (1/4 inch slices)
1/2 tsp black pepper
2 1/2 cups diced Yukon Gold potatoes
1 roll refrigerated ‘Grands’-type biscuits (’Flaky Layer’ style)
12 oz ‘Black & Tan’ beer (I use Yuengling)
2 tsp dried tarragon
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp ground allspice (or nutmeg)
2 Tbsp corn starch (mixed with 2 Tbsp cold water)
1/2 cup chopped roasted red peppers
1 1/2 cups grated sharp Cheddar cheese

PREPARATION:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a stockpot or large saucepan, bring the stock, chicken, onion, carrots, and black pepper to a simmer; cover and cook 5 min.

Add the potatoes, return to a simmer, and cook 6-7 minutes until the potatoes are just tender. Remove the chicken and vegetables from the stock and set aside. Reserve the stock.

Remove and separate the biscuits. Take a biscuit, find a spot between the layers about halfway down, and carefully separate it into two approximately equal halves (in other words, two round, half-height biscuits.) Repeat with the rest of the biscuits.

Generously coat the inside of a large casserole dish with cooking spray. Take eight of the ‘half-biscuits’ and line the bottom of the casserole, stretching and overlapping where necessary. Bake at 350 degrees for 10-12 minutes until lightly browned.

While the biscuits are baking, add the beer, tarragon, cayenne, and allspice to the stock. Bring to a low boil and cook 5 minutes.

Stir in the corn starch and continue stirring until thickened (about 1 minute.) Remove from the heat and stir in the chicken / veg mixture and the red peppers. Adjust salt and pepper to taste.

Ladle the filling into the casserole, sprinkle on the cheese, and top with the remaining biscuits, stretching and overlapping where necessary (rustic-looking is good!)

Bake 12-15 minutes or until biscuits are golden.

NOTE: To prevent the underside of the bottom layer of biscuits from becoming too dark, place the casserole in a heavy baking pan or cookie sheet to diffuse the heat.

Enjoy!

You Can Read More of Doug’s Recipe Corner Here.

Hugging the Coast Blog Fast ForwardPlease join us soon to see our latest food and cooking article: New Fish and Seafood Recipe Ideas and Tips on About.Com: March 8th to March 15th 2011.

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(Photo Credit: Yukon Gold Drunken Chicken Biscuit Pot Pie from Doug DuCap Food and Travel on Flickr.


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Tue
15
Feb '11

Zesty Game Day BBQ Rooster Sauce Recipe For Parties and Grilling

Zesty Game Day BBQ Rooster Sauce Recipe by Food and Travel Writer Doug DuCap

Doug DuCap's Original Recipes

Warning: this sauce is kinda hot. Not bhut jolokia, ‘oh-my-God-what-have-I-done’ hot. But definitely hot enough to make you sit up and pay attention. That won’t, however, stop you from going back for more, because it’s just so darn tasty.

(Yeah, yeah, we know: those of you who snack on habaneros like they were Pringles will probably think this sauce is about as hot as a McDonald’s milkshake. Duly noted. Try to remember that we don’t all have Kevlar palates, okay?)

I made this for the Super Bowl as an all-purpose hot dog / hamburger / wing / whatever sauce and it went over big. Since then, I’ve been putting this on literally everything, including (but not limited to): fried eggs, cottage cheese, lo mein noodles, tortilla chips, steamed vegetables, and (no kidding) a peanut butter sandwich.

I haven’t put it on vanilla ice cream yet, but only because I don’t have any vanilla ice cream in the house at the moment. But I will.

You can find most of the ingredients easily: Sriracha (aka Rooster Sauce) has become very popular of late, and green jalapeno Tabasco Sauce is readily available. Smoked paprika is a bit harder to come by, but can be found in specialty food stores and also online. You can substitute sweet paprika plus a few drops of liquid smoke flavoring (mesquite is best for this.)

The ‘gold’ style of barbeque sauce (aka sweet mustard-based) favored here in coastal Carolina is becoming more broadly available. I used Cattleman’s Carolina Gold, but any brand should work just fine.

Make up a batch of this and refrigerate it for a few hours to let the flavors meld. Then try it on a hot dog or a burger. Then try it on something else. Then try to stop.

(Note: If you want the flavor but with less fire, mix one part sauce with two parts mayonnaise.)

Here’s how to make the Zesty Game Day BBQ Rooster Sauce Recipe:

Ingredients:

3/4 cup ‘gold’ style (sweet mustard) BBQ sauce (such as Cattleman’s brand Carolina Gold)
1 Tbsp Sriracha sauce
1 Tbsp green jalapeno hot sauce
2 tsp spicy mustard
2 tsp liquid from pickled jalapenos (or from other pickled hot peppers)
1 tsp smoked paprika
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1/4 tsp onion powder
1/4 tsp black pepper

PREPARATION:

Combine all ingredients and refrigerate for several hours before using.

Enjoy!

You Can Read More of Doug’s Recipe Corner Here.

Hugging the Coast Blog Fast ForwardPlease join us soon to see our latest food and cooking article: New Fish and Seafood Recipe Ideas and Tips on About.Com: February 11th to February 16th 2011.

Hugging the Coast Blog Fast Forward

If you liked this article on HuggingtheCoast.Com, you might also enjoy:

(Photo Credit: Zesty Game Day BBQ Rooster Sauce from Doug DuCap Food and Travel on Flickr.


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Mon
20
Dec '10

In BBQ Hash We Trust


Southern Comfort Foods: Sweet Potato and Country Ham BBQ Hash Recipe

Book Excerpts and Food Articles by Doug DuCap

“If there was no faith there would be no living in this world. We couldn’t even eat hash with safety.”
–Josh Billings (AKA Henry Wheeler Shaw)

Despite our sometimes vast cultural or geographic differences, the foodstuffs we humans eat can be grouped into the following broad categories:

1) Meat & Poultry
2) Fish & Seafood
3) Dairy Products
4) Vegetables & Grains
5) Don’t Ask

The last group (one of my personal favorites) includes — in addition to most hot dogs — things like Scottish Haggis, Pennsylvania Dutch Scrapple, Mexican Tacos de Cabeza, and many, many other tasty dishes from around the world whose contents, it is widely said, are best left unexamined (hence the suppression of inquiry) in the belief that what you don’t know can’t make you retch violently.

It’s easy to see that there’s a homespun sort of common sense to that notion. Unless, of course, you’re the type who likes to torment others:

Guest: “These sausages are very unusual!”
Host: “Do you like them?”
Guest: “Yes, I do. I think they’re delicious, actually! What’s in them?”
Host: (quietly grinding homespun common sense under his heel) “Well, they’re the specialty of an island off the coast of Tasmania. You see, the natives take the gall bladders and prostate glands of these giant indigenous muskrat-like creatures, dry them in the sun, and…”
Guest: (pale and bug-eyed) “UR-UR-URGHHH! AAAAH-URGHHH-ECHHHH!”

For some reason, Carolina barbecue hash is often unfairly tossed under the Mystery Meat Bus. Granted, it is a bit unexpected on first encounter; hash is thought of as a more or less solid food, and is usually made up of diced meat of some kind along with a diced root vegetable, most often potatoes (as in corned beef hash) and diced whatever else (like the beets in red flannel hash.) In any case, it is, most emphatically, not a liquid.

No doubt about it, liquid hash is a tough idea to wrap your brain around. But the origin of the word ‘hash’, the Old French hacher, meaning to chop up, doesn’t indicate anything about stopping. One doesn’t even need to stop at the liquid stage. Theoretically, scientists at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland could, at this very moment, be hard at work making Quark-Gluon Hash.

But questions about where they would procure sub-atomic fried eggs to top their hash with are not relevant here. What’s important is clearing up these misunderstandings about Carolina barbeque hash.

The Myth: The Ingredients Are Mysterious, Unspeakable, and/or Unnamable

Here’s what some folks believe the recipe for barbeque hash must look like:

1 extra large heap of guts
3-4 heads (preferably pork, but any will do)
12 hooves
10 lbs of anything else lying around
4-6 of anything that stops moving long enough
1 medium onion, chopped
Salt & pepper to taste

In a hellaciously large black cauldron, combine the first six ingredients (guts through onion.)
Boil the everlovin’ tar out of the whole mess. Grind thoroughly using a Mercruiser 200 hp Outboard Immersion Blender.
Adjust seasonings; serve over white rice. Laugh up sleeve at anyone fool enough to eat it.

The Fact: Back in the day, barbecue hash may indeed have been something of a ‘catch-all’ dish, but no more. It’s increasingly rare to find hash made with head meat or any sort of offal. Those few BBQ joints that do add liver or ears or cheek have a devoted following, including myself (for instance, I find the barbecue at the well-regarded Roger’s Bar-B-Q House in Florence, SC to be acceptable but not exciting. On the other hand, their peppery hash — redolent with liver and lord knows what — is absolutely off the chain.)

What really goes into hash? The ingredients are shockingly (perhaps even disappointingly) simple. There are additions and variations, of course, but it’s basically just pork barbeque, potatoes, onions, and some tomato product — most often catsup. Chop or grind it all up, add some salt, a good handful of black pepper, some water or stock, simmer the heck out of it, and you’ve got your basic barbeque hash. That’s it. The resulting reddish slurry is ladled over rice and forms one of the pillars (the others being coleslaw, pickles, and sliced white bread) of the pantheon of barbeque side dishes. (Note: we’re talking here about the purist’s pantheon, i.e., the roadside shack or old time version; other places may offer a dozen tasty side dishes like stewed okra, proper baked mac & cheese, collards cooked with smoked neck bones, etc.)

Pit masters (i.e., those who oversee the long, slow smoke-cooking of meats) are often proud and quite protective of their barbeque hash. Most have a secret ingredient or three (like spicy mustard, hot pepper sauce, or Worcestershire) that makes their hash (of course) the best. It’s the rare pit master who is careless or indifferent about his hash — and they don’t stay in business long anyway.

It all boils down to this: hash isn’t mysterious or even complicated. It does, however, require care. The ideal Carolina barbeque hash should be peppery, a bit tangy, distinctly smoky, and ineffably comforting. It should be the soft, savory, and reliable companion to the gleaming, slightly chewy white rice that sits next to your pile of tender, slow-cooked pork. It should be there for you, to soothe and delight you whether you’re 8 months old, cranky, and toothless or 80 years old, cranky, and toothless. Barbeque hash should be, ultimately, something in which — despite the vagaries and tumult and disappointments of life — you can have faith.

Hugging the Coast Blog Fast ForwardPlease join us soon to read our newest food and cooking feature on HuggingtheCoast.Com: Sing a Song of Shrimp: 41 Party Friendly Shrimp Recipes For Entertaining.

Hugging the Coast Blog Fast Forward

If you liked this article on HuggingtheCoast.Com, you might also enjoy:

(Photo Credit: Southern Comfort Foods: Sweet Potato and Country Ham BBQ Hash from Doug DuCap Food and Travel on Flickr.


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Find Out More About the Knack Fish & Seafood Cookbook by Doug DuCap and Linda Beaulieu Enjoy Doug's Original Seafood Recipes on About.Com Fish and Seafood Cooking

Follow HuggingtheCoast on Twitter

Find Out More About the Knack Fish & Seafood Cookbook by Doug DuCap and Linda Beaulieu




Find Free Original RecipesRead Previous Posts Knack Fish and Seafood Cookbook

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